From the Bayou to the Bay: Voices of Gulf Resistance

Cherri Foytlin, BOLD Louisiana

Cherri Foytlin, BOLD Louisiana

Jackie Antalan, Operation Homecare

Black communities were led to believe that we were irresponsible, that’s why all of these things are happening to us, but now we know it’s not, it’s our environment. It’s what’s been brought into our backyards and our neighborhoods that we didn’t know was there.

Jackie Antalan, Operation Homecare

Jayeesha Dutta, Radical Arts Healing Collective

The idea of love as being central to this movement is one that I do not believe is soft. I actually believe that is one of the most radical things you can do is to centralize love in this movement because without that, without us being connected as human beings to each other, we’re not going to survive.

Jayeesha Dutta, Radical Arts Healing Collective

Ramsey Sprague, Mobile Environmental Justice Action Coalition

I had respiratory infections that would leave me debilitated for two weeks of the year annually, that was my state. As a child I never questioned it. I never thought there was something fundamentally wrong with me, or something wrong with the air I breathe. It’s simply how it was right?

Ramsey Sprague, Mobile Environmental Justice Action Coalition

Robert Desmarais Sullivan, First Unitarian Universalist Church NOLA

That flag you see me with, that is actually the Cajun flag. Where I come from the people were fishermen, but then they got offered more money to work in the petrochemical industry so they gave up the fishing and the shrimping except for weekends. What they were producing ended up poisoning them.

Robert Desmarais Sullivan, First Unitarian Universalist Church NOLA

Donny Verdin, Tribal Councilman United Houma Nation, Lafourche Parish

I believe one of the major reasons we’re not federally recognized is because most of the land that our communities are on or were on are very rich in oil and gas, there are drilling operations going on, so I believe their lobbyists are blocking our recognition.

Donny Verdin, Tribal Councilman United Houma Nation, Lafourche Parish

Anne Rolfes, Louisiana Bucket Brigade

Anne Rolfes, Louisiana Bucket Brigade

George Barisch, Commercial shrimper, St. Bernard Parish

There’s thousands of people who are sick. I’m minimally sick compared to some of these people. I can still work. Some people can’t. Young kids, 30, with kids, sick.

George Barisich, Commercial Shrimper, St. Bernard Parish

Shana griffin, mother, feminist, activist, independent researcher

If disaster strikes again, one of the things that Katrina has taught us is that low-income communities and people of color are going to be targeted and criminalized and blamed. They’re going to be called looters, there’s going to be a police state that shows up to force people out of the city, we know those things are going to happen. So you have people right now organizing to reduce the jail size, to stop criminalization, but they don’t see how that’s connected to climate.

Shana griffin, mother, feminist, activist, and independent researcher

Alicia Cooke, 350 Louisiana

Alicia Cooke, 350 Louisiana

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350 is a global org that's inspiring the world to rise to the challenge of the climate crisis. This blog is a look behind the scenes at how we do that.

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350.org

350.org

350 is a global org that's inspiring the world to rise to the challenge of the climate crisis. This blog is a look behind the scenes at how we do that.

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